Biography

Alexander Proudlock was born in Newcastle Upon-Tyne in 1992. He studied his degree in Composition and Performance with Dr David Horne in Manchester at the Royal Northern College of Music, before completing a master's in Composition at the Royal Academy of Music in London under the Tony Award winning orchestrator Christopher Austin.​

Proudlock's music has been included in events and festivals such as BBC Radio 3's New Choral Music, in which his work 'Dirge of December' for choir was broadcast from St. Paul's Church, London, his work 'Candlelight Whispers' was premiered at the Barnabas Music Festival and performed by acclaimed cellist Jonathan Bloxham. In addition, his music has been performed by members of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the BBC Singers, CHROMA, the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and the Manchester Camerata. ​

To date, Alexander has released three albums, written music for two short films and an eclectic catalogue of concert music. Alexander released his debut solo album 'Theoplicity' in 2018, his second album ‘Common Ground’ in 2019 was released for his work on the film under the same name. Later this year Alexander will record a new piece 'Trailblaze' with the Budapest Symphony Orchestra, which will be released in a new album showcasing his eclectic catalogue of chamber and orchestral works. His musical score for the film 'A Night Out',  is to be his third album and showcases performances by award winning saxophonist Emma McPhilemy and the Jonny Ford Jazz Quartet.. 'A Night Out' won numerous awards including Best Short Film at the LIAFF and also the Critics Choice Award for Alexander's work on the soundtrack.​

He also continues to support emerging talent and is honorary composer for the international performer competition New Stars and member of the London Film Institute. Proudlock's honours and awards include the Leverhulme Artists Award and the Sunday for Sammy Trust. 

Fiona Nicholl

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Alexander Proudlock

Location 
Alexander Proudlock , Tyne & Wear
United Kingdom
Tyne & Wear GB